Parish House Peace and Justice Hive

The Parish House Peace & Justice Hive provides comfortable and attractive rental office space, as well as certain common services and meeting places, to community-based peace and justice organizations and non-profits.

For the Parish House Peace and Justice Hive in this current period, it is the mission of St Peter’s…

•  To provide comfortable and attractive rental office space, as well as certain common services and meeting places, to community-based peace and justice organizations and non-profits, such that the interaction and synergy might deepen their service to our parish, our neighborhood, and our city.

•  To use the opportunity of this creative mix and the renewed spaces also to develop new ministries and projects.

•  To provide, when available, such space to budding entrepreneurial or small neighborhood businesses where consistent with this overall vision.

St. Peter’s Episcopal Churche Detroit Peace and Justice Hive

Interested in renting space? See the PDF below.
Parish Hall Peace and Justice Hive Information

St. Peter’s Episcopal Churche Detroit Peace and Justice Hive

History

1925 Construction begins on Parish House. The plan was for the rector (pastor) to live
on the third floor with parish offices and activities on the first two floors.

1929-48 St. Peter’s is a “mission” for part of this time, sometimes having a live-in
rector, other times only a visiting priest for Sunday Services.

1948-1962 The parish Hall becomes a residence for teenage youth offenders under
the leadership of the rector who was also a chaplain to the Juvenile Court. Eventually
the youth home outgrows the space and moves to the westside, becoming St. Peter’s
Home for Boys (still operating).

1962-1982 The Parish House becomes a “halfway house” for Federal Prisoners
from Milan.

1981 WARM (Weatherization and Retrofit Maintenance) is begun in a portion of the
building. Its mission is to train people for jobs in weatherization, a field expected to grow
with the first “fuel crisis”. WARM soon outgrows its space and moves to its current
location on Michigan Ave. and 31st.

1982 COTS (Coalition on Temporary Shelter) replaces the halfway house . COTS
is a response to a growing number of homeless individuals. .” We kept an amazing
number of men, women and children in the Parish House.” But they outgrow St. Peter’s
within a few years and move into their own hotel.

1987- 1988 The “Detroit/Windsor Refugee Coalition” begins sheltering Central
American refugees seeking sanctuary from their countries’ “dirty wars” This effort
likewise outgrows the space, moves to St. Anne’s Church and continues as “Freedom
House.”

1988- 2003 The Parish helps start and houses what eventually will become
Alternatives For Girls (AFG) to help young women who are on the street or in danger
of being there. AFG grows and eventually secures its own building on West Grand
Blvd..

2004-2010 Young Detroit Builders (YDB) occupies the Hall. It is dedicated to
training and finding employment in construction trades for young adults. It too outgrows
the space.

2010 The St. Peter’s community decides to reinvent the Hall as a Peace and Justice
“Hive” of community-based organizations, fledgling nonprofits and social businesses, a
neighborhood resource and incubator. Now is the next chapter…

Historical record thanks to Fr. John Meyer, pastor of St. Peter’s from 1982-2005.

_______________________


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